The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

The Deeper Pain, The Syrian World, 6, 3, November 1931, p. 10 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgiban, TheDeeperPain, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Gibran’s Message to Young Americans of Syrian Origin (reprinted from the first issue of Syrian World), The Syrian World, 5, 8, April 1931, pp. 44–45 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

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The issue is especially long as it was published the same month famed poet and contributor to the Syrian World, Kahlil Gibran, passed away. There are only just a few inclusions in the article that are not related to Gibran's passing. The first is an article discussing the concept of chivalry in Arabia and Islam. This article primarily deals with the origin of chivalry, which seems to point to the crusades in which Moslem and Christian knights met in combat. Salloum Mokarzel in addition to his tribute work to Gibran is featured for the continuation of his travels through Jebel-Druze. There is then the usual installment of Ali Zaibaq, now a regular series of The Syrian World, and finally there is the inclusion of what usually closes the issues out, the political developments in Syria and excerpts from the Arab press. However intermingled within the regular stories, are works dedicated to Gibran. First there is a discussion of his last days, followed by a description of his Boston funeral. The remainder of the pieces are works by other authors normally featured in the Syrian World, and while the rest pay tribute to one of the most important Lebanese literary figures of all time.

Tags: 1931, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, MessagetoYoungAmercicans, SyrainWorld, Syrian

In 1920-1930

The Great Recurrence [Reprinted from the Herald Tribune, Dec. 23, 1928], The Syrian World, 6, 4, December 1931, pp. 12–14 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

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'The Great Occurrence' speaks about the miraculous nature of Jesus Christ. The rest of the poetry in this issue that is edited by Barbara Young is also entirely Christmas related. 

Tags: 1928, 1931, heraldtribune, thegreatrecurrence, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

A Marvel and a Riddle, The Syrian World, 5, 5, January 1931, p. 18 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, amarvelandriddle, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Past and Future, The Syrian World, 5, 6, February 1931, p. 40 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, pastandfuture, poem, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Reflections on Love, The Syrian World, 6, 2, October 1931, p. 44 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, poem, reflectionsonlove, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Speech and Silence, The Syrian World, 5, 7, March 1931, p. 36 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, poem, speechandsilence, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Revelation (trans. Andrew Ghareeb), The Syrian World, 5, 10, June 1931, pp. 24–25 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1931, andrewghareeb, revelation, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Archibald Clinton Harte on Gibran's Funeral Procession from Beirut to Becharreh, 11th October, 1931, p. 1.
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[...] The nearest village to The Cedars is Becharreh which is about ten kilometres away and is the birthplace of Khalil Gibran who recently died in America. Gibran first left Becharreh for the United States at the age of 12 with his parents and returned at the age of 16 and lived in his native village until he was 20 when he and his mother returned to America. In America he was befriended by a good woman and so went forward with his studies in art and literature in particular and rewarded those who had been interested in him by being a success. When his native village heard of his death and his desire to be buried in his home town, they interviewed the French High Commissioner who responded splendidly. The Fabre Line brought the body to Beirut gratis and at Beirut the body was received by the High Commissioner, Army officials, boy scouts, etc. The procession from Beirut via Tripoli to Becharreh was a triumphal procession. At every village there were ever-green arches and the procession tarried while village notables made speeches. The funeral procession was the joyous kind of funeral that one thinks one would like. The bedouin rode to and fro giving displays of horsemanship, banners were flying, bands were playing, and bells were ringing as far as the homecoming of a victor. There were constant accessions to the train of automobiles and the home village was crowded with delegations from villages as far as 50 and 60 miles away. One said, "It is a pity that Khalil did not come home and learn what we thought of him but we are glad to have him rest among us and we rejoice in his success." I found only a few who knew his book "Jesus the Son of Man", and only two who had read "The Prophet". [...]
Tags: 1931, Archibald, Funeral, Letters

In Digital Archive

Kahlil Gibran, Painter, Dies, "St. Louis Post-Dispatch" (St. Louis, Missouri), Sat, Apr 11, 1931, p. 1.

Tags: 1931, death, newspaper

In Digital Archive

Letter of Barbara Young to Mr. Isham (and a sketch by Gibran), New York City, 26th April 1931.
 
Young states 'You have been many times in my thoughts since the hour you spent with the great pictures in the Studio' and continues 'All that is now over. We are sailing May 4th for England, then the continent and eventually Syria. The pictures will go almost intact to Beshari', adding that some will remain in the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Young further adds 'I am sending you a sketch which Gibran once sent me in a letter - and was therefore by his own hand. This is my recognition of your beautiful understanding of his work.' 
Tags: 1931, BarbaraYoung, Isham, NewYork, Sketch