The Kahlil Gibran Collective

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In Digital Archive

Donna M. Brown, "Pioneers of a New Age: Kahlil Gibran (1883–1931)", The Esoteric Quarterly, Fall 2017, pp. 91-96.
Tags: 2017, article, esoteric, NewAge

In Digital Archive

Hoda Thabet, "Four American Cultural Institutions in Khalil Gibran’s The Prophet and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland", University of Iceland, School of Humanities, Faculty of Foreign Languages, Literature and Linguistics, 2016.
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This paper investigates the influence of Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1835) and The Prophet by Khalil Gibran (1883-1930) on American literature from the perspective of four major cultural institutions. In the literature currently available, there is little in reference to the influence of Gilman and Gibran- two marginalized writers at the beginning of the era of American realism- on the discourse of American literature. 
The purpose of this study is to focus primarily on the works of Gibran examining how he depicts four vital cultural institutions. The researcher will compare another marginalized writer, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, with Gibran and both of their focuses on, and the impact of, four cultural institutions on their writing. The institutions focused on are family, education, religion, and love of country. Gibran was a male who lived in an era when society oppressed women and considered them unequal to men. Gilman was a female who lived in the same era. Each has a very analytical, fictional approach to how things could be if they were different in real life. They are from two different traditions. Gibran was an Arab immigrant, who was a pioneer of Modern Arabic American literature. Gilman was an American woman living in a society where women are not valued nor considered equal to men. Many consider her a pioneer in feminism because of her in-depth look at women and their place in society in her writings. There is value in analyzing the works of writers from two different traditions. The comparison and contrast between the two gives a basis for better understanding each. It further enhances the understanding of a literature work’s impact on a historical era, as well as the impact that the historical era has on the literature of the time. Doing a comparative study of literature from the same period and with similar themes leads to greater understanding of not only the literature but the society of the time. An examination of their literary comparisons between Herland and The Prophet and their impact on the culture of the era is a focus of this paper. The structure of the intended analysis of Herland and The Prophet is as follows: to investigate three major factors. First, the researcher will examine Gibran’s work in light of its place in the literature of its individual culture and in relation to transcendentalism. Second, the researcher will then examine Gilman’s work in light of its culture. Finally, the researcher will compare the effect of Herland and The Prophet on four major cultural institutions of their era. The four investigated institutions included are family, religion, education, and love of country (patriotism). Many scholars trace Herland and The Prophet in the study of American literature as pioneering iconic works. However, critical and cultural approaches proposed in the literary studies will compare the featured writings of Gibran to Gilman. The comparative study of inter-textual relation between The Prophet and Herland will define a more in-depth understanding of how their writing influenced the four institutions defining culture.
 
Tags: 2016, CharlottePerkinsGilman, TheProphet, thesis

In Digital Archive

Lebsir Mohamed & Louiza Akram, "Misinterpretation in Literary Translation in Gibran Khalil Gibran’s The Prophet", The University 8 Mai 1945 (Algeria), 2016. 
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This study aimed at investigating the difficulties that translators who deal with the English and Arabic language may face when translating literary expressions. Particularly, it aimed at answering the following questions: 1. What are the main difficulties, related to translation that may lead the translator to misinterpret the source text (English) into (Arabic)? 2. What are the elements that should be taken into consideration to translate, interpret adequately from ST to TT? To achieve the goal of this study, the researcher selected The Prophet by Gibran Khalil Gibran translated work from English to Arabic following the two translations by Tharwat Okasha and Antonious Bachir. The researcher focused on two key elements which are subjectivity and equivalence taking into account many odd elements that are mainly related to literary works such as cultural aspects and linguistic as well as extra-linguistic features of the language. The results show that in order to avoid misinterpreting the source text, the translator has to carefully select the equivalent words and expressions taking into account all aspects of the source language as well as being objective while translating. Adequate literary translation must bring an equivalent and objective production of the source text’s style, meaning, and sometimes structure. Otherwise, the subjective and distinctive literary use in the original text will not transmit the three aspects in the target text.
 
Tags: 2016, arabic, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

H.P.S., review of Gibran's "The Madman", The Liberator, Issue No. 11, Jan 1919, p. 44.
Tags: 1919, Review, themadman

In Digital Archive

Star of the West, Vol. 10, No. 4, May 17, 1919, p. 60; Vol. 10, June 24, 1919, p. 110.
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Mr. Gibran of New York, said, “ One of the most beautiful things in religion is the statement revealed by God: ‘I was a hidden Treasure and I created man that I might be known. ’ By drawing closer together we get nearer to God, richer in His knowledge. Those who think that the fighting spirit and success in arms alone make a first class peo­ple have yet much to learn. The uni­versal note of harmony is the music of the spheres.”­ (p. 60)
 
Convey my greeting to Dr. Guthrie and Kahlil Gibran and say: “In the future some Tablets will be sent that ye­ may translate them, and, having translated them, print them.” (p. 110)
 
Tags: 1919, AbdulBaha, Tablets

In Digital Archive

Mirza Ahmad Sohrab, "The Story of the Divine Plan Taking Place During, and Immediately Following World War I", New York: The New History Foundation, 1947 (Digitally republished, East Lansing, Mi.: H-Bahai, 2004, p. 103).
 
Tags: 1947, AbdulBaha

In Digital Archive

Barbara Young, The Man Who Could Not Die: A Tale of Judas the Disciple, Illustrated by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Privately Printed, 1932 (Inscribed by the Author).

Tags: 1932, BarbaraYoung, book, illustrations, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Raml wa-zabad (Sand and Foam), Translated into Arabic by Anṭūniyūs Bashīr, al-Qāhirah: Yūsuf al-Bustānī, 1927 (1st edition).

 
Source: Arab American National Museum
 
Tags: 1927, antuniyusbashir, arabic, sandandfoam

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Der Prophet (The Prophet), translated into German by Georg-Eduard Freiherr von Stietencron, München: Hyperionverlag, 1925.

Tags: 1925, German, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

al-Sābiq (The Forerunner), Translated into Arabic by Anṭūniyūs Bashīr, Egypt: al-Hilāl, 1924 (1st edition).
 
Source: Arab American National Museum 


Tags: 1924, antuniyusbashir, arabic, theforerunner, translation

In Digital Archive

Kahlil Gibran: A Remembrance, The Word, Vol. 27, No. 2, February 1983.
 
Magazine published by the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America. This issue includes an article by Jean Gibran remembering Kahlil Gibran in what would be his 100th year.
Source: Arab American National Museum 
Tags: 1983, article, JeanGibran

In Digital Archive

Majmūʻat al-Rābiṭah al-Qalamiyyah li-Sanat 1921 (The Collection of the Pen Bond for the Year 1921), New York, 1921.
 
Anthology of writings by members of al-Rābiṭah al-Qalamiyyah. Index begins on page 313, contents listed by author begins on page 316. 
Authors: Nasib Arida; Rashid Ayyoub; Wadi Bahout; William Catzeflis; Kahlil Gibran; Abd al-Masih Haddad; Nadra Haddad; Elia Abu Madi; Mikhail Naimy.
 
Source: Arab American National Museum
 
Tags: 1921, arabic, Arrabitah, magazine, thepenbond, thepenleague

In Digital Archive

As-Sayeh, 1923
 
Source: Arab American National Museum
 
Tags: 1923, arabic, Arrabitah, magazine, thepenbond, thepenleague

In Digital Archive

Fragmentos de El Loco de Kahlil Gibran: La Ciudad Santa (Excerpts from The Madman by Kahlil Gibran: The Blessed City, translated into Spanish), Clarinidas, Santiago de Chile, Year II, No. IV, Sept. 1926, pp. 5-6.
 
Tags: 1926, magazine, spanish, themadman, translation

In Digital Archive

Associated Press, Obituary - Mikhail Naimy, Unknown Newspaper, February 1988.
Tags: 1988, article, MikhailNaimy, obituary

In Digital Archive

Elia Abu Madi, Diwan Iliya Abu Madi al-Juz' al-Thani, Introduction and Illustrations by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Mir'at al-Gharb al-Yawmiyyah, 1919.
 
Source: Arab American National Museum 


Tags: 1919, arabic, Arrabitah, eliaabumadi, Poetry

In Digital Archive

Elia Abu Madi, Al-Jadawil (The Streams), with an introduction by Mikhail Naimy and drawings by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Mir'at al-Gharb al-Yawmiyyah, 1927.
 
Source: Arab American National Museum 


Tags: 1927, Abu, arabic, Arrabitah, Elia, Madi, Poetry

In Digital Archive

Mikhail Naimy (Mīkhāʼīl Nuʻaymah), al-Ghirbāl (The Sieve), Miṣr (Egypt): Yuṭlab min al-Maṭbaʻah al-ʻAṣrīyah li-ṣāḥibihā Ilyās Anṭūn Ilyās bi-Miṣr, 1923.

Tags: 1923, ArabicLiterature, Essays, MikhailNaimy

In Digital Archive

Ernie G. Tannis, Mediator: A Life on the Edge of History, ADR, Fall 2012, pp. 3-4.

Tags: 2012, article, JohnFKennedy, TedSorensen

In Digital Archive

Gibran Khalil Gibran, Naya Zamana (Anthology in Urdu), 1968.
Tags: 1968, anthology, Urdu