The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

Autumn Exhibition [Catalogue], Season 1915-1916, New York: Montross Gallery, October 2-23, 1915.

Tags: 1915, Catalogue, Exhibiton, kahlilgibran, MontrossGallery, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Jurji Zaydan, Al-Hilal, January 1915, pp. 309-310.

Tags: 1915, Al-Hilal, JubranKhalilJubran, jurjizayden, kahilgibran

In Digital Archive

To Albert Pinkham Ryder, New York: privately printed by Cosmos & Wasburn, 1915.
Tags: 1915, albertpinkhamryder, ode

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Aglavaine and Selysette, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1915.
Tags: 1915, Cover, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Pelléas and Mélisande, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1915.
Tags: 1915, book, Cover, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Thomas Lynch Raymond (undated). 
______
 
Thomas Lynch Raymond, Jr. (April 26, 1875 – October 4, 1928) served two non-consecutive terms as Mayor of Newark, New Jersey from 1915 to 1917 and again from 1925 to 1928.
Tags: 1915, 1925, Letters, ThomasLynchRaymond

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Orrick Johns, October 15, 1915
 
Letter to poet Orrick Glenday Johns (June 2, 1887 – July 8, 1946), in part: "How more than gracious of you to send me this remarkable sonnet. It delights me exceedingly, and though it reveals a world beyond my reach I cannot but be moved by it. And what is this in life that sustains us, we poor children of hunger and thirst, but that which intensifies our thirst and deepens our hunger? Is it not the unattainable that loves and comforts us?-and how well you have expressed the unattainable in your sonnet. And may I not know more of you and your work? Indeed it would give me a real pleasure to read your poetry. And if some happy chance should find you again in this city, I would be very glad to see you and talk with you…many thanks for that wonderful sonnet." 
The recipient of this letter, poet Orrick Johns, was part of a literary group that included luminaries T. S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. In 1912, Johns rose to literary prominence after winning a poetry contest for his piece 'Second Avenue,' ousting Edna St. Vincent Millay's famed 'Renascence.' His next collection, 'Asphalt and Other Poems' was published in 1917; the warm approval Gibran lavished on him here may have been regarding a sonnet destined for that book.
Tags: 1915, Letters, OrrickJohns