The Kahlil Gibran Collective

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The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

Rasaʼil Jubran [Letters of Kahlil Gibran], Introduction by Jamil Jabr, Beirut: Manshurat Maktabat Bayrut, 1951.

Tags: 1951, GibrankhalilGibran, Kahlil, kahlilgibran, Letters, Rasa'ilJubran

In Digital Archive

Mayy Ziyadah, Rasaʼil Mayy [Letters of Mayy Ziyadah to various recipients, including Kahlil Gibran], Beirut: Dar Bayrut, 1954.

Tags: 1954, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, Letters, MayyZiyadah

In Digital Archive

Rasa’il Jubran at-ta’ihah [The Lost Letters of Kahlil Gibran], Edited by Riad Hunayn, Beirut: Mu'assasat Nawfal, 1983.

Tags: 1983, kahlilgibran, Letters, TheLostLettersofKahlilGibran

In Digital Archive

Corinne Robinson Alsop Cole family papers
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Family papers of Corinne Douglas (Robinson) Alsop Cole, daughter of Douglas Robinson and Corinne (Roosevelt) Robinson, younger sister of American president Theodore Roosevelt.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Cole, Corinne Robinson Alsop, 1886-1971. Family papers, 1853-1954. MS Am 1785.8 (130). Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1886, 1954, Harvard, Letters, Roosevelt

In Digital Archive

Corinne Roosevelt Robinson papers
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Papers of Corinne (Roosevelt) Robinson, younger sister of American president Theodore Roosevelt and wife of Douglas Robinson; a published poet and active member of the Republican party.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Robinson, Corinne Roosevelt, 1861-1933. Papers, 1847-1933. MS Am 1785 (515). Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1861, 1933, Harvard, Letters, Papers, Roosevelt

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody papers
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Josephine Preston Peabody (May 30, 1874 – December 4, 1922) was an American poet and dramatist.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Peabody, Josephine Preston, 1874-1922. Josephine Preston Peabody papers, 1896-1924. MS Am 1990 (1-85). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1874, 1922, 1990, Harvard, Josephine, Letters, Papers, Peabody, Preston

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody Additional papers

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Josephine Preston Peabody (May 30, 1874 – December 4, 1922) was an American poet and dramatist.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Peabody, Josephine Preston, 1874-1922. Additional papers, 1874-1922. MS Am 2161 (300-301). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1874, 1922, Harvard, Josephine, Letters, Papers, Peabody, Preston

In Digital Archive

Letters of Kahlil Gibran to Witter Bynner
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Harold Witter Bynner, also known by the pen name Emanuel Morgan, (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) was an American poet, writer and scholar. While a student he took on the nickname "Hal" by which his friends would know him for the rest of his life. Bynner was friendly with Kahlil Gibran and introduced the writer to his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. 
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Bynner, Witter, 1881-1968, recipient. Letters from various correspondents, 1900-1958. MS Am 1629 (80-90). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
Tags: 1881, 1968, knopf, Letters, poet, Witter, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Witter Bynner papers
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Harold Witter Bynner, also known by the pen name Emanuel Morgan, (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) was an American poet, writer and scholar. While a student he took on the nickname "Hal" by which his friends would know him for the rest of his life. Bynner was friendly with Kahlil Gibran and introduced the writer to his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. 
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Bynner, Witter, 1881-1968. Witter Bynner papers, 1829-1965. MS Am 1891.6 (70-74). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1881, 1968, Harvard, knopf, Letters, Papers, poet, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Letter from Kahlil Gibran to the President of the Syrian American Club of Boston, 07-28-1916 (draft).

Tags: 1916, American, Letters, President, Syrian

In Digital Archive

Archibald Clinton Harte on Gibran's Funeral Procession from Beirut to Becharreh, 11th October, 1931, p. 1.
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[...] The nearest village to The Cedars is Becharreh which is about ten kilometres away and is the birthplace of Khalil Gibran who recently died in America. Gibran first left Becharreh for the United States at the age of 12 with his parents and returned at the age of 16 and lived in his native village until he was 20 when he and his mother returned to America. In America he was befriended by a good woman and so went forward with his studies in art and literature in particular and rewarded those who had been interested in him by being a success. When his native village heard of his death and his desire to be buried in his home town, they interviewed the French High Commissioner who responded splendidly. The Fabre Line brought the body to Beirut gratis and at Beirut the body was received by the High Commissioner, Army officials, boy scouts, etc. The procession from Beirut via Tripoli to Becharreh was a triumphal procession. At every village there were ever-green arches and the procession tarried while village notables made speeches. The funeral procession was the joyous kind of funeral that one thinks one would like. The bedouin rode to and fro giving displays of horsemanship, banners were flying, bands were playing, and bells were ringing as far as the homecoming of a victor. There were constant accessions to the train of automobiles and the home village was crowded with delegations from villages as far as 50 and 60 miles away. One said, "It is a pity that Khalil did not come home and learn what we thought of him but we are glad to have him rest among us and we rejoice in his success." I found only a few who knew his book "Jesus the Son of Man", and only two who had read "The Prophet". [...]
Tags: 1931, Archibald, Funeral, Letters

In Digital Archive

Letter of Gibran to Cecilia Beaux (c. 1917)
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Cecilia Beaux (May 1, 1855 – September 17, 1942) was an American society portraitist, in the manner of John Singer Sargent. She was a near-contemporary of American artist Mary Cassatt and also received her training in Philadelphia and France. Her sympathetic renderings of the American ruling class made her one of the most successful portrait painters of her era.
Tags: 1917, CeciliaBeaux, Letters, Portraitist

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Elizabeth McCausland, Nov. 5, 1928.
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Elizabeth McCausland (1899–1965) was an American art critic, historian and writer.

Tags: 1928, ElizabethMcCausland, Letters

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Thomas Lynch Raymond (undated). 
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Thomas Lynch Raymond, Jr. (April 26, 1875 – October 4, 1928) served two non-consecutive terms as Mayor of Newark, New Jersey from 1915 to 1917 and again from 1925 to 1928.
Tags: 1915, 1925, Letters, ThomasLynchRaymond

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran (Unknown Recipients, Undated)

Tags: Invitation, Letters

In Digital Archive

Letters of Kahlil Gibran to Archbishop Antonious Bashir
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Gibran’s letters to Archbishop Antonious Bashir were unknown and unpublished until November 11, 2004 when they appeared in the original Arabic in Al-Mulhaq, the weekly literary supplement for the Lebanese newspaper An-Nahar. According to An-Nahar, these letters remained hidden among the archives of the Greek Orthodox Diocese in North America. It appears that Archbishop Philip Saliba was one day searching in the old files of his predecessor, Antonious Bashir, when he accidentally found these letters. Bashir was the translator of The Prophet into Arabic. The Lebanese newspaper adds that these letters acquire great importance as they constitute, on the one hand, a dialogue between the author and his translator, and on the other hand, they form part of Gibran’s great literary heritage of which many hidden treasures have not yet been discovered.

Tags: 2004, An-Nahar, Archbishop, Bashir, Letters

In Digital Archive

Mary Haskell Minis, Diary (undated) [Folder 226] 
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Copies of the records of Haskell's meetings with Kahlil Gibran from earlier diaries.
 
Minis Family Papers, 1739-1948, Subseries 2.3. Diaries, 1894-1944 and undated, Minis Family Papers #2725, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Tags: #2725, 1944, 1948, ChapelHill, Correspondence, Letters, maryelizabethhaskell, MinisFamilyPapers, SouthernHistoricalCollection, UniversityOfNorthCarolina

In Digital Archive

Records of Haskell's visits to Gibran in New York City. Contains a letter from Arthur Farwell, the president of the American Music Society.
 
Minis Family Papers, 1739-1948, Subseries 2.3. Diaries, 1894-1944 and undated, Minis Family Papers #2725, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Tags: 1944, ChapelHill, Correspondence, Dairies, Letters, maryelizabethhaskell, MinisFamilyPapers, NCU, NewYork, SouthernHistoricalCollection, SubSeries2.3

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Orrick Johns, October 15, 1915
 
Letter to poet Orrick Glenday Johns (June 2, 1887 – July 8, 1946), in part: "How more than gracious of you to send me this remarkable sonnet. It delights me exceedingly, and though it reveals a world beyond my reach I cannot but be moved by it. And what is this in life that sustains us, we poor children of hunger and thirst, but that which intensifies our thirst and deepens our hunger? Is it not the unattainable that loves and comforts us?-and how well you have expressed the unattainable in your sonnet. And may I not know more of you and your work? Indeed it would give me a real pleasure to read your poetry. And if some happy chance should find you again in this city, I would be very glad to see you and talk with you…many thanks for that wonderful sonnet." 
The recipient of this letter, poet Orrick Johns, was part of a literary group that included luminaries T. S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. In 1912, Johns rose to literary prominence after winning a poetry contest for his piece 'Second Avenue,' ousting Edna St. Vincent Millay's famed 'Renascence.' His next collection, 'Asphalt and Other Poems' was published in 1917; the warm approval Gibran lavished on him here may have been regarding a sonnet destined for that book.
Tags: 1915, Letters, OrrickJohns

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to James Oppenheim (circa 1916)
 
Letter to James Oppenheim (1882–1932), author and editor of the short-lived Seven Arts magazine. In full: “This war poem came to the Seven Arts through me. It might interest you to read it. I have been wrestling with an angel and a devil during the past two months. And it is indeed terrible to be between two powers so different. In a week or so I shall leave town for a much needed rest in the country. May I not see you before I go?” 
The Seven Arts was founded with the idealistic goal of transforming American life through the arts, featuring contributors such as Dreiser, Frost, Mencken, and Dos Passos, but folded in 1917 after just one year. In 1916, Gibran was preoccupied with the war in his native Syria, actively soliciting funds and suffering emotional distress at any war news; although he diverted his energy toward writing, the predominant theme from this period was death. In September he left New York to visit his sister on Cape Cod hoping to relieve this building stress, but suffered a nervous breakdown. A remarkable letter from a tumultuous period of Gibran’s life that influenced his writing for years to come.
Tags: 1916, JamesOppenheim, Letters, magazine, SevenArts

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Un abito arabo per "Il Profeta". Lettere inedite di Kahlil Gibran a Antony Bashir, «Kervan», 7-11, gennaio 2010, pp. 37–57.

Tags: 2010, AntonyBashir, FrancescoMedici, italian, Letters

In Digital Archive

Maria Amalia De Luca, Le lettere di Gibràn a Mayy Ziyàdah, "Oriente Moderno", LX, 1980, pp. 123–131.

Tags: 1980, Letters, MariaAmaliaDeLuca, MayyZiyadah

In Digital Archive

Lettere a Mayy di Gibràn Khalìl Gibràn, versione dall'arabo di Maria Amalia De Luca, prefazione di Andrea Borruso, "Quaderni del Mediterraneo", 2, 1981, pp. 29–127.

Tags: 1981, italian, Letters, MariaAmaliaDeLuca, MayyZiyadah

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Isaac Horowitz, 10 July 1928 (2nd page)
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Boston, 10 July 1928 My dear Mr. Horowitz, Thank you […] for sending me a copy of the preface which you have written for your translation of The Prophet. It is indeed beautiful, and it is most generous. […] [I]t is good and refreshing to find you and Henri Bergson agreeing on the most important manifestations of life and self. I am delighted to know that you are interested in that which is deeper than intellect. […] I would suggest […] your sending a copy of the ‘preface’ to my publishers. […] The Knopfs would be interested because they are bringing out my book Jesus [the Son of Man] early in October, and, naturally, they would know all the kindly things said of one of their authors, and they would tell you where to place your extremely understanding piece. Of course you will tell my publishers of your translation, and also of its possible publication abroad. It was most kind of you to send me the photograph of the actors who read The Prophet at Freedom Hill. I know in my heart that each and every one of you visited for an hour the dear city of our deeper desires, the distant city of Orphalese. I am delighted to know that you are coming to settle in New York; and I shall be most happy to know you personally. With kindest regards believe me. Faithfully yours Kahlil Gibran P.S. Mr. Campbell of Alfred A. Knopf may be the most informative. Write to him if you care to do so.

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Isaac Horowitz (July 23, 1893-March 21, 1961) was born in Yefureni, Romania. He lived in Jassy until 1909 and then emigrated to the United States. He worked in a sweatshop and simultaneously studied. From 1912 he was publishing poetry in Fraye arbeter shtime (Free voice of labor), Forverts (Forward), Di vokh (The week), Di feder (The pen), Di tsvayg (The branch), and Kinder-zhurnal (Children’s magazine)—all in New York. He edited: Di fraye muze (The free muse) in 1913, the monthly Der vegetaryer (The vegetarian) in 1916, and Di vegetarishe velt (The vegetarian world) in 1921—all in New York. He contributed to the journal Der naturist un vegetaryer (The naturist and vegetarian) (New York, 1920). In the 1920s he moved to Los Angeles, where he brought out the journal Der mayrev (The West). Among his books: Vegn moyshe nadir, kritishe polemik (On Moyshe Nadir, a critical polemic) (Brooklyn: Aleyn, 1919), 32 pp.; Dos kol fun di shtume (“The voice of the dumb”) (New York: Aleyn, 1920), 95 pp. Concerning vegetarianism: Ven der lerer iz nishto (When there is no teacher) (Vilna: Naye yidishe folkshul, 1928), 16 pp.; Parnose-gever, un ven der lerer iz nishto (The breadwinner, and When there is no teacher), a one-act play (New York, Workmen’s Circle, 1929), 15 pp.; Teg un nekht mit panait istrati (Days and nights with Panait Istrati) (New York, 1940), 172 pp.; Mayn tatns kretshme (My father’s shop) (New York: Matones, 1953), 220 pp. He translated Khalil Gibran’s Der novi (The Prophet) (Warsaw-New York, 1929), 96 pp. He used the pseudonyms: Danilo, Veritas, and A. H-ts. He died in New York.

Tags: 1928, Correspondence, Horowitz, Letters

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Carolus Verhulst, 10 May 1927

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In 1921, Carolus Verhulst (1900-1985), at that time 21 years old, founded the bookstore/publishing company Servire in The Hague, NL. The name Servire is an allusion to Verhulst's wish that his publishing company would be subservient to humanity. About 1928, he married Elisabeth Duif (1901-1971). Together with his wife, he managed the publishing company until her decease.
Verhulst wanted to run a company which published esoteric and philosophic works. The '20's were not suited for such a policy. As a result, the Servire catalogue had a general nature and contained works on various fields such as art, the Dutch East Indies, esotery, history, nature, novels, philosophy and travelling.
Verhulst was a convinced pacifist. In the early '20's, he was one of the first Dutchmen who resisted draft. This resulted in imprisonment. In the years which preceded World War II, he also published idealistic and pacifistic literature and leaflets.
The publication shortly before the invasion by the Germans in the Netherlands of A.M. Meerloo's Homo militans - de psychologie van oorlog, ziekte en vrede in de mens, in which national-socialism was forcefully condemned, resulted in a conflict between Verhulst and the Germans. They forbade him to publish; he once was threatened with death. With the help of others, he could lay hand on paper and managed to publish. As a security measure, his authors and translators often used a pseudonym.
After the war, Verhulst resumed his publishing activities. From 1967, Servire publishers was seated in Wassenaar, adjacent to The Hague, at the Zijdeweg 5a. In 1976, Verhulst ended his work at Servire publishers. In November 1976, he founded an esoteric/philosophical publishing company, named Mirananda, a company which since 2004 carries the name Synthese. The name Mirananda, a contraction of Mira and Ananda, means: beatitude in love, and shines light upon Verhulst's ideas and ideals.
For many years, Servire publishers remained an independent company. In 1981, Felix Erkelens became in charge of the company. Under his management, Servire publishers became entirely devoted to the publishing of esoteric literature. In April 1999, Servire publishers became part of Veen publishers, Utrecht, NL.

Tags: 1927, CarlousVerhulst, Correspondence, Dutch, Letters, translation