The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

Yasūʻ ibn ʼal-ʼinsān [Jesus the Son of Man], Translated into Arabic by Sharwat 'Ukāshah, Bayrūt: Dār al-Shurūq, 1999.

Tags: 1999, arabic, JesusSonofMan, translation

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Mashk-o-tabassum [A Tear and a Smile], Translated into Urdu by Habeeb Ashar, Lahore Aaina Adab, 1959.

Tags: india, tearandasmile, tearsandlaughter, translation, Urdu

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Arzi Devta [The Earth Gods], Translated into Urdu, Lahore: Urdu Mahal, 1951.
Tags: 1951, theearthgods, translation, Urdu

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Mragjalatil Moti (sukti Sagrah) [Sayings], translated into Hindi, Ahmedabad: Navjivan Prakashan Mandir, 1951.

Tags: 1951, HIndi, sayings, translation

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Aansu Aur Muskarahat [A Tear and a Smile], Translated into Hindi, Delhi: Narayan Dutt Sahagal & Sons, 1959. 

Tags: 1959, HIndi, india, tearandasmile, tearsandlaughter, translation

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Ret Aur Ghhag [Sand and Foam], Translated into Hindi, Delhi: Rajpal And Sanja, 1956.

Tags: 1956, HIndi, india, sandandfoam, translation

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Usne Kaha [The Prophet], Translated into Sanskrit, Uttar Pradesh: Bharatiy Akhil Sangh Seva, 1957.

Tags: 1957, Sanskrit, TheProphet, translation

In 1960-1970

K. Gibran, Shershtha Kabita [Poetry Collection], Translated into Bengali, Kolkata: Karuna Prakasani, 1960.

Tags: 1960, Bengali, collection, translation

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Carolus Verhulst, 10 May 1927

___________

In 1921, Carolus Verhulst (1900-1985), at that time 21 years old, founded the bookstore/publishing company Servire in The Hague, NL. The name Servire is an allusion to Verhulst's wish that his publishing company would be subservient to humanity. About 1928, he married Elisabeth Duif (1901-1971). Together with his wife, he managed the publishing company until her decease.
Verhulst wanted to run a company which published esoteric and philosophic works. The '20's were not suited for such a policy. As a result, the Servire catalogue had a general nature and contained works on various fields such as art, the Dutch East Indies, esotery, history, nature, novels, philosophy and travelling.
Verhulst was a convinced pacifist. In the early '20's, he was one of the first Dutchmen who resisted draft. This resulted in imprisonment. In the years which preceded World War II, he also published idealistic and pacifistic literature and leaflets.
The publication shortly before the invasion by the Germans in the Netherlands of A.M. Meerloo's Homo militans - de psychologie van oorlog, ziekte en vrede in de mens, in which national-socialism was forcefully condemned, resulted in a conflict between Verhulst and the Germans. They forbade him to publish; he once was threatened with death. With the help of others, he could lay hand on paper and managed to publish. As a security measure, his authors and translators often used a pseudonym.
After the war, Verhulst resumed his publishing activities. From 1967, Servire publishers was seated in Wassenaar, adjacent to The Hague, at the Zijdeweg 5a. In 1976, Verhulst ended his work at Servire publishers. In November 1976, he founded an esoteric/philosophical publishing company, named Mirananda, a company which since 2004 carries the name Synthese. The name Mirananda, a contraction of Mira and Ananda, means: beatitude in love, and shines light upon Verhulst's ideas and ideals.
For many years, Servire publishers remained an independent company. In 1981, Felix Erkelens became in charge of the company. Under his management, Servire publishers became entirely devoted to the publishing of esoteric literature. In April 1999, Servire publishers became part of Veen publishers, Utrecht, NL.

Tags: 1927, CarlousVerhulst, Correspondence, Dutch, Letters, translation

In Digital Archive

Halil Cibran, Gezgin [The Wanderer], translated into Turkish by Sibel Özbudun, İstanbul: Anahtar Kitaplar, 1995.

Tags: 1995, TheWanderer, translation, Turkish

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Le prophète, translated into French by Madeline Mason-Manheim, Paris: Éditions du Sagittaire, 1926.

Tags: 1926, french, MadelineMason-Manheim, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

Étienne Naveau, "La réception de l’œuvre de Khalil Gibran en Indonésie", Archipel 75, Paris, 2008, pp. 63-110.

Tags: 2008, french, Indeonesian, Paris, study, theses, translation

In Digital Archive

Bing Xin, “Autobiographical Notes,” Renditions – A Special Section on Bing Xin, translated into English by J. Cayley, No. 32, Autumn 1989, pp. 83–87.

Tags: 1989, Bin, Chinese, TheProphet, translation, XIn

In Digital Archive

Marina Tolmacheva, In Memoriam: Anna Dolinina (1923–2017), Review of Middle East Studies, 51(2), 2017, pp. 339–340.

Tags: 2017, AnnaDolinina, Mahjar, translation

In Digital Archive

Koliswa Moropa, "The initiator in the translation process: A case study of The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran in the indigenous languages of South Africa", South African Journal of African Languages, Volume 32, Issue 2, 2012, pp. 99-109. 
______ 
This article examines the role played by the initiator in the translation of The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran into the indigenous South African languages and the resulting influence on the translator's decisions. This is achieved through an exploration of how this work came to be translated into the indigenous languages of South Africa, with a discussion of who initiated the translation process, and the intention behind the decision. Translation scholars generally agree that the translator is seldom given an explicit brief; it then becomes his or her responsibility to ask for one. In considering the function of the initiator in the translation of this work by Gibran, the aim was to establish whether the brief provided by the initiator was useful. The article seeks to establish some guidelines as to what constitutes a clear translation brief, in the case of literary translation in particular.
 
Tags: 2012, SouthAfrica, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

Ibrahem Bani Abdo & Sajida B. Yaseen, "A Cultural Contrastive Translation Study of Omission in Gibran's the Broken Wings", Journal of Social Sciences, Vol.8, No.4, 2019, pp. 805-816. 
_________
 
This study investigates how omission may affect the aesthetic features of the target text (TT) compared to the source text (ST) and does omission lead to a loss of meaning in translating the aesthetic entertaining features of Gibran's Al-‘Ajniha Al-Mutakaserah source text (ST) compared to its English equivalent novel target text (TT) the Broken Wings. It aims to discuss the effects of omission in the translation process between Arabic and English and whether this selected technique may affect the semantic level and the loss of meaning of the target text compared to the source text. Consequently, this article detects omission of metaphor, simile, and repetition and how it may affect the semantic levels of the source text (ST). It is a qualitative comparative analysis examines omission of 20 random samples extracted from Gibran’s Al-‘Ajniha Al-Mutakaserah (1912). The sample is grouped in five categories according to the type of omitted figurative expression as (i) Repetitions; (ii) Metaphors; (iii) Adverb of status; (iv) Personification; and (v) Similes. Each sample is assigned according to their functions. The semantic differences in terms of functions were identified to based on Newmark (1988); Petrulionė (2012); Nida & Taber (2003); Baker (2011); Farghal & Shunnaq (1999); Jayyusi (1977); Ryding (2011); Al-Batal (1990); Abdul-Raof (2006); Johnstone (1991); Obeidat (1997); Younis (2015) and Leppihalme (1997). The results show that omission in translating such poetic novel causes loss of the aesthetic semantic features. The sense of originality and the figurative language have been lost. The intentional or unintentional omission lessens the embellishment embedded in the source text (ST). Finally, omission produces a different effective version, other than the source text (ST).
 
Tags: 2019, arabic, BrokenWings, English, translation

In Digital Archive

Esteban Fayad, "Gibran Khalil Gibran y Amin Rihani", Mundo Árabe, Jun 30, 1947, p. 10.

Tags: 1947, AmeenRihani, arabic, article, spanish, translation

In Digital Archive

"Gibrán Jalil Gibrán: vda y obra del principe de los poetas arabes", Mundo Árabe, Nov 15, 1972, pp. 3-4.
Tags: 1972, article, spanish, translation

In Digital Archive

"Gibrán Jalil Gibrán: Espuma y Arena", Mundo Árabe, Nov 15, 1973, p. 12.

Tags: 1973, sandandfoam, spanish, translation

In Digital Archive

Kamila Ghalmi, "The translation of metonymy in Kahlil Gibran's story 'Rose Hanie'", University of Abou Bakr Belkaïd, Tlemcen, Algeria, 2019.

Tags: 2019, arabic, SpiritsRebellious, translation