The Kahlil Gibran Collective

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The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, The Bethrothal, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1918.
Tags: 1918, book, Cover, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, The Burgomaster of Stilemonde, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1918. 
Tags: 1918, book, Cover, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Sister Beatrice and Ardiane & Barbe Bleue, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1902.
Tags: 1902, bokk, Cover, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Poems, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1915.
Tags:

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, The Intruder and Other Plays, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1914.
Tags: 1914, book, covers, Design, FredHollandDay, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Mary Magdalene, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1910.
Tags: 1910, book, Cover, Design, fredhollanday, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Maurice Maeterlinck, Our Eternity, cover design by Kahlil Gibran, New York: Dodd, Mead and Co., 1913.
Tags: 1913, book, Cover, Design, MauriceMaeterlinck

In Digital Archive

Wafa' Stephan, The Personality of Gibran Khalil Gibran: A Psychological Study of his Life and Work [book review], Al-Raida, November 1, 1983, Vol. VI, No. 26, pp. 1, 7-9.

Tags: 1983, book, personality, Review, study

In Digital Archive

The Holy Man by Kahlil Gibran, translated into Yiddish by Naftali Gross, Kinderland, Vol. 1, No. 3, March, 1921, p. 12.

Tags: 1921, Parables, translation, yiddish

In Digital Archive

Each One and his Truth by Kahlil Gibran, translated into Yiddish by Naftali Gross, Kinderland, Vol. 1, No. 4, April, 1921, p. 11.
Tags: 1921, Parables, Translations, yiddish

In Digital Archive

The Slaves and the Cat by Kahlil Gibran, translated into Yiddish by Naftali Gross, Kinderland, Vol. 1, N0. 5, May, 1921, p. 8.
Tags: 1921, Parables, translation, yiddish

In Digital Archive

Der Novi (The Prophet), translated into Yiddish by Isaac Horowitz, Warsaw (Poland): Yatshkovski’s Biblyotek, 1929.
Tags: 1929, TheProphet, translation, yiddish

In Digital Archive

Lagrimas e sorrisos (Kitāb Dam‘ah wa Ibtisāmah), translated into Brazilian Portuguese by José Mereb, Rio de Janeiro: Typograhia Guarany Pelotas, 1920 [owned by Mary Elizabeth Haskell].

Tags: 1920, maryelizabethhaskell, portuguese, tearsandlaughter, translation

In Digital Archive

al-Nabī [The Prophet], Translated into Arabic by Mīkhāʼīl Nuʻaymah [Mikhail Naimy], Bayrūt: Nawfal, 2015 (1st edition: Bayrūt: Nawfal, 1956).

Tags: 1956, arabic, MikhailNaimy, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

al-Nabī [The Prophet], Translated into Arabic by Sharwat 'Ukāshah, Bayrūt: Dār al-Shurūq, 2000.
Tags: 2000, arabic, TheProphet, translation

In Digital Archive

Nadeem N. Naimy, Mikhail Naimy: An Introduction, Beirut: American University of Beirut, 1967.
Tags: 1967, AUB, introduction, MikhailNaimy

In Digital Archive

Piney Kesting, The Borderless Worlds of Kahlil Gibran, Aramco World Magazine, July-August 2019, pp. 28-38.

Tags: 2019, Aramco, article, magazine, news

In Digital Archive

A Poet-Painter of Lebanon, The American Review of Reviews, Edited by Albert Shaw, New York: The Review of Reviews Company, vol. LIX, January-June 1919, p. 212.

Tags: 1919, Amercian, AmericanMonthlyreview, Review

In Digital Archive

The Great Recurrence, New York Herald Tribune Magazine (The Sunday Star), Dec. 23, 1928, p. 19.

Tags: 1928, magazine, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Larry Luxner, A Garden for Gibran, Aramco World Magazine, March-April 1990, pp. 2-5.

Tags: 1990, Aramco, article, magazine

In Digital Archive

Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet: Curriculum Guide For the Film, Journeys in Film-Participant Media, 2015.

Tags: 2015, Film, guide, ParticpantMedia, TheProphet

In Digital Archive

Corinne Robinson Alsop Cole family papers
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Family papers of Corinne Douglas (Robinson) Alsop Cole, daughter of Douglas Robinson and Corinne (Roosevelt) Robinson, younger sister of American president Theodore Roosevelt.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Cole, Corinne Robinson Alsop, 1886-1971. Family papers, 1853-1954. MS Am 1785.8 (130). Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1886, 1954, Harvard, Letters, Roosevelt

In Digital Archive

Corinne Roosevelt Robinson papers
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Papers of Corinne (Roosevelt) Robinson, younger sister of American president Theodore Roosevelt and wife of Douglas Robinson; a published poet and active member of the Republican party.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Robinson, Corinne Roosevelt, 1861-1933. Papers, 1847-1933. MS Am 1785 (515). Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1861, 1933, Harvard, Letters, Papers, Roosevelt

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody papers
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Josephine Preston Peabody (May 30, 1874 – December 4, 1922) was an American poet and dramatist.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Peabody, Josephine Preston, 1874-1922. Josephine Preston Peabody papers, 1896-1924. MS Am 1990 (1-85). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1874, 1922, 1990, Harvard, Josephine, Letters, Papers, Peabody, Preston

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody Additional papers

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Josephine Preston Peabody (May 30, 1874 – December 4, 1922) was an American poet and dramatist.
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Peabody, Josephine Preston, 1874-1922. Additional papers, 1874-1922. MS Am 2161 (300-301). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1874, 1922, Harvard, Josephine, Letters, Papers, Peabody, Preston

In Digital Archive

Letters of Kahlil Gibran to Witter Bynner
__________ 
Harold Witter Bynner, also known by the pen name Emanuel Morgan, (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) was an American poet, writer and scholar. While a student he took on the nickname "Hal" by which his friends would know him for the rest of his life. Bynner was friendly with Kahlil Gibran and introduced the writer to his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. 
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Bynner, Witter, 1881-1968, recipient. Letters from various correspondents, 1900-1958. MS Am 1629 (80-90). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
Tags: 1881, 1968, knopf, Letters, poet, Witter, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Witter Bynner papers
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Harold Witter Bynner, also known by the pen name Emanuel Morgan, (August 10, 1881 – June 1, 1968) was an American poet, writer and scholar. While a student he took on the nickname "Hal" by which his friends would know him for the rest of his life. Bynner was friendly with Kahlil Gibran and introduced the writer to his publisher, Alfred A. Knopf. 
Harvard University - Houghton Library / Bynner, Witter, 1881-1968. Witter Bynner papers, 1829-1965. MS Am 1891.6 (70-74). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

Tags: 1881, 1968, Harvard, knopf, Letters, Papers, poet, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Holly Arida & Richard Alan Popp, Writing Together: Two Generations of Arab Americans Serve the Public Purpose, Al Jadid, Vol. 16, no. 63, 2010, pp. 6-9.

Tags: 2010, aljadid, ArabAmerica, magazine, Review

In Digital Archive

Letter from Kahlil Gibran to the President of the Syrian American Club of Boston, 07-28-1916 (draft).

Tags: 1916, American, Letters, President, Syrian

In Digital Archive

Archibald Clinton Harte on Gibran's Funeral Procession from Beirut to Becharreh, 11th October, 1931, p. 1.
____________
[...] The nearest village to The Cedars is Becharreh which is about ten kilometres away and is the birthplace of Khalil Gibran who recently died in America. Gibran first left Becharreh for the United States at the age of 12 with his parents and returned at the age of 16 and lived in his native village until he was 20 when he and his mother returned to America. In America he was befriended by a good woman and so went forward with his studies in art and literature in particular and rewarded those who had been interested in him by being a success. When his native village heard of his death and his desire to be buried in his home town, they interviewed the French High Commissioner who responded splendidly. The Fabre Line brought the body to Beirut gratis and at Beirut the body was received by the High Commissioner, Army officials, boy scouts, etc. The procession from Beirut via Tripoli to Becharreh was a triumphal procession. At every village there were ever-green arches and the procession tarried while village notables made speeches. The funeral procession was the joyous kind of funeral that one thinks one would like. The bedouin rode to and fro giving displays of horsemanship, banners were flying, bands were playing, and bells were ringing as far as the homecoming of a victor. There were constant accessions to the train of automobiles and the home village was crowded with delegations from villages as far as 50 and 60 miles away. One said, "It is a pity that Khalil did not come home and learn what we thought of him but we are glad to have him rest among us and we rejoice in his success." I found only a few who knew his book "Jesus the Son of Man", and only two who had read "The Prophet". [...]
Tags: 1931, Archibald, Funeral, Letters

In Digital Archive

al-Sanabil [The Spikes of Grain], New York: As-Sayeh, 1929. 
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The last of Gibran’s Arabic books was published in 1929. Al-Sanabil [The Spikes of Grain] is a commemorative anthology of his works that was presented to him at an Arrabitah banquet.
Tags: 1929, anthology, arabic, book, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Letter of Gibran to Cecilia Beaux (c. 1917)
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Cecilia Beaux (May 1, 1855 – September 17, 1942) was an American society portraitist, in the manner of John Singer Sargent. She was a near-contemporary of American artist Mary Cassatt and also received her training in Philadelphia and France. Her sympathetic renderings of the American ruling class made her one of the most successful portrait painters of her era.
Tags: 1917, CeciliaBeaux, Letters, Portraitist

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Elizabeth McCausland, Nov. 5, 1928.
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Elizabeth McCausland (1899–1965) was an American art critic, historian and writer.

Tags: 1928, ElizabethMcCausland, Letters

In Digital Archive

Felix Faris papers 
_________
 
Between 1921 and 1922 Felix Faris (Filīks Ḥabīb Fāris, 1882-1939), a prominent Lebanese activist, journalist, writer, poet and translator, spent seven months in the United States. In New York he met the members of “Arrabitah” – The Pen Bond (al-Rābiṭah al-Qalamiyyah) – and became a close friend of Gibran, who considered him a «great literary brother.» He met Gibran for the first time on January 27, 1922, in New York, at Marie El-Khoury’s (Mārī Azīz al-Khūrī, 1883-1957), a refined Syrian-born American journalist and jewelry designer, who had invited them to dinner at her table. Her dinners are told legendary, because «she often served meals in which every course was the color of a gemstone,» and their conversation on that occasion lasted until three o’clock in the morning. Felix recorded his impressions of Gibran in his journal and, when his friend died, he published in Lebanon excerpts from them and exchanged letters. Reading his memories of his stay in the United States, we learn that Felix was upset by Kahlil’s emaciated looks, who in that period suffered a weak constitution, but admired his willpower, despite his disease. Gibran loved his friend’s poems and appreciated best amongst the others Munājāt al-Nafs (Soliloquy), but his favorite one was Turbat al-Judūd, to the point that he promised its author that he would have translated it into English, and he kept the promise. When Felix returned to Lebanon, he received from Kahlil this untitled manuscript: [Forefathers’ Ashes] From the pain of bitter parting To the laughing, faithless sea: From the merciless waves of fear, And then to prison and despair! Is this what I sought, my Salwa, When I left you and my home? And behold me now, in a night Whose ears are deaf to my cries, Whose eyes are blind unto my grief. But what if my morn should come? And the star of my morn should rise? What would they bring save a memory To a heart over-burdened with memories? O my thoughts, my stricken thoughts, Fly not towards my homeland, And enter not into my house, Lost, you touch with your dark wings The sleep-veiled eyelids of my mate. Oh for a breath from that fragrant vale, Oh for a draught from that singing stream And for a handful from my forefathers’ ashes To be strewn, as they lay me low, Into my lonely grave. According to what was told by Felix Faris, Gibran’s translation of the poem was published in some «literary magazine,» but there is no other information about it. He never saw Gibran again, and kept the manuscript safe as a precious relic of the great man and poet.
Tags: 1922, felixfaris, Papers, thepenbond

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Thomas Lynch Raymond (undated). 
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Thomas Lynch Raymond, Jr. (April 26, 1875 – October 4, 1928) served two non-consecutive terms as Mayor of Newark, New Jersey from 1915 to 1917 and again from 1925 to 1928.
Tags: 1915, 1925, Letters, ThomasLynchRaymond

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran (Unknown Recipients, Undated)

Tags: Invitation, Letters

In Digital Archive

Today Even As Yesterday - Unpublished Manuscript (Barbara Young Collection)

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[Today Even As Yesterday] Today, the sun is in the sky Even as yesterday And the birds sing ceaselessly in the forest Yet lightless is my day and songless. Even as yesterday The wind dances upon the hills And the bay trees and the lilies Melt tenderly into space Yet breathless is my day and scentless. Today, my heart throbs Even as yesterday Yet here it lies in a coffin as dead. The hours beat the muffled drums And memory, half dumb, Speaks the funeral oration. And regret is digging the grave. O love, you who walk the earth in search of life Lay your hand again upon my heart And say it is not dead. Disperse these mourners And let me rise again To walk with you Even as yesterday.

In 1925 the poet Barbara Young (pseudonym of Henrietta Breckenridge Boughton) became Gibran’s secretary. She remained with Gibran for the rest of his life and played a major role in events after his death.

Tags: 1925, BarbaraYoung, manuscript

In Digital Archive

Ship Manifest (Spaarndam, 1895)
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Passenger Record
  • First Name: Jubran
  • Last Name: Rhamé
  • Nationality: Syria, Syrian
  • Date of Arrival: June 17th, 1895
  • Age at Arrival: 11y
  • Gender: Male
  • Ship of Travel: Spaarndam
  • Port of Departure: Rotterdam via Boulogne
  • Manifest Line Number: 0273
Also his half-brother, mother and sisters were inaccurately listed as follows:
 
  • Poutros Rhamé, aged 20, merchant
  • Camé Rhamé, aged 40
  • Marianna Rhamé, aged 9
  • Sultaní Rhamé, aged 7
  • Intended Destination: New York
Tags: 1895, Manifest, Ship, Spaarndam

In Digital Archive

Ship Manifest (Saint Paul, 1902)
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Passenger Record

  • First Name: Gibran K.
  • Last Name: Gibran
  • Nationality: Syria, Syrian
  • Last Place of Residence: Beyrouth
  • Final Destination in the United States: Boston, Mass.
  • Date of Arrival: May 10th, 1902
  • Age at Arrival: 20y
  • Gender: Male
  • Marital Status: Single
  • Occupation: Student
  • Ship of Travel: Saint Paul
  • Port of Departure: Southampton
  • Manifest Line Number: 0014
Tags: 1902, Manifest, SaintPaul, Ship

In Digital Archive

Ship Manifest (Nieuw Amsterdam, 1910)
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Passenger Record

  • First Name: Kahlel
  • Last Name: Gebian [Gebrian/Gibrian?]
  • Nationality: Turkey, Syrian
  • Last Place of Residence: Paris, France
  • Date of Arrival: October 31st, 1910
  • Age at Arrival: 27y
  • Gender: Male
  • Marital Status: Single
  • Ship of Travel: Nieuw Amsterdam
  • Port of Departure: Rotterdam, Holland
  • Manifest Line Number: 0012
Tags: 1910, Amsterdam, Manifest, Nieuw, Ship

In Digital Archive

Kahlil Gibran: Memorial, Copley Square, Boston, Sept. 25, 1977 (Poster)

Tags: 1977, Boston, copleysquare, memorial, poster

In Digital Archive

Gibran Kahlil Gibran: Registration Card (September 12, 1918)

Tags: 1918, NewYork, RegistrationCard, report

In Digital Archive

Floyd Starr, Kahlil Gibran Was a Man I called My Friend (Undated Talk) 
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Floyd Elliot Starr (1883-1980) was the founder and president of the Starr Commonwealth for Boys in Albion, Michigan, which he guided for more than fifty years. After attending Albion College and receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1910, he was employed at the Bernarr McFadden’s Healthatorium in Chicago and then at the Beulah Home for Boys. In 1913, he was able to purchase forty acres of land on Montcalm Lake and established his own nonprofit home and residential school for delinquent, homeless, and neglected boys, that later became the Starr Commonwealth for Boys.
Tags: 1883, FloydStarr, Talk

In Digital Archive

Gibran Kahlil Gibran, 25 Dollar Check, Bank of the Manhattan Company, New York, 14 August 1928. 
_________________
 
Gibran was holder of an account at the Bank of the Manhattan Company (31 Union Square, New York City). This twenty-five dollar check dated 14 August 1928 and signed by him as «G.K. Gibran» was made out to his fellow citizen Joseph Salah of Bisharri, owner of the Sheik Restaurant which was situated in Boston at 199 Longwood Ave.
Tags: 1928, Bank, Check, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Letters of Kahlil Gibran to Archbishop Antonious Bashir
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Gibran’s letters to Archbishop Antonious Bashir were unknown and unpublished until November 11, 2004 when they appeared in the original Arabic in Al-Mulhaq, the weekly literary supplement for the Lebanese newspaper An-Nahar. According to An-Nahar, these letters remained hidden among the archives of the Greek Orthodox Diocese in North America. It appears that Archbishop Philip Saliba was one day searching in the old files of his predecessor, Antonious Bashir, when he accidentally found these letters. Bashir was the translator of The Prophet into Arabic. The Lebanese newspaper adds that these letters acquire great importance as they constitute, on the one hand, a dialogue between the author and his translator, and on the other hand, they form part of Gibran’s great literary heritage of which many hidden treasures have not yet been discovered.

Tags: 2004, An-Nahar, Archbishop, Bashir, Letters

In Digital Archive

The Way Seemed Long and Rough (Unpublished Manuscript), Josephine Preston Peabody papers
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Harvard University - Houghton Library / Peabody, Josephine Preston, 1874-1922. Josephine Preston Peabody papers, 1896-1924. MS Am 1990 (89). Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.
Tags: 2019, JosephinePeabody, manuscript, Poems

In Digital Archive

Mercedes de Acosta, Here Lies the Heart: A Tale of My Life, New York: Reynal, 1960, pp. 91-93, 105, 140.

Mercedes de Acosta (1892-1968) was an American poet, playwright, and novelist. De Acosta wrote almost a dozen plays, only four of which were produced, and she published a novel and three volumes of poetry. She was professionally unsuccessful but is known for her many lesbian relationships with famous Broadway and Hollywood personalities and numerous friendships with prominent artists of the period.

Tags: 1917, 1960, memoirs, Mercedesdeacosta, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Karen Neslund, Gibran Combines Poetry, Philosophy, Art for Classic, 'The Clarion', Bethel College and Seminary, St. Paul, Minn., Volume XL — No. 3, Tuesday, October 1, 1963, p. 3.

Tags: 1963, article, newspaper

In Digital Archive

Mary Haskell Minis, Diary (undated) [Folder 226] 
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Copies of the records of Haskell's meetings with Kahlil Gibran from earlier diaries.
 
Minis Family Papers, 1739-1948, Subseries 2.3. Diaries, 1894-1944 and undated, Minis Family Papers #2725, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Tags: #2725, 1944, 1948, ChapelHill, Correspondence, Letters, maryelizabethhaskell, MinisFamilyPapers, SouthernHistoricalCollection, UniversityOfNorthCarolina

In Digital Archive

Records of Haskell's visits to Gibran in New York City. Contains a letter from Arthur Farwell, the president of the American Music Society.
 
Minis Family Papers, 1739-1948, Subseries 2.3. Diaries, 1894-1944 and undated, Minis Family Papers #2725, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Tags: 1944, ChapelHill, Correspondence, Dairies, Letters, maryelizabethhaskell, MinisFamilyPapers, NCU, NewYork, SouthernHistoricalCollection, SubSeries2.3

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody, The Prophet [probably inspired by Kahlil Gibran], The Singing Man: A Book of Songs and Shadows, Boston-New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1911, pp. 53-55.

Tags: 1911, JosephinePeabody, Poetry, TheProphet

In Digital Archive

Issa J. Boullata, Gibran in the Diaries of Josephine Preston Peabody, "al-'Arabiyya", Vol. 10, No. 1/2 (Spring & Autumn 1977), Georgetown University Press, pp. 33-41.

Tags: 1977, al-arabiyya, Dairies, JosephinePeabody

In Digital Archive

Josephine Preston Peabody, The Cedars [probably inspired by Kahlil Gibran], The Singing Leaves: A Book of Songs and Spells, Boston-New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1903, p. 16.

Tags: 1903, book, JosephinePeabody, Poems

In Digital Archive

Howard Willard Cook, Our Poets of Today [dedicated to Julia Ellsworth Ford, Witter Bynner, Kahlil Gibran, Percy Mackaye], New York: Moffat, Yard & Company, 1919.

Tags: 1919, dedication, JuliaEllsworthFord, Poetry, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Witter Bynner, Cycle [dedicated to Kahlil Gibran], A Book of Plays, New York: Knopf, 1922, p. 145.

Tags: 1922, dedication, play, WitterBynner

In Digital Archive

Glen Mullin, Blake and Gibran [Review: K. Gibran, Twenty Drawings, New York: Knopf, 1919], The Nation, April 10, 1920, pp. 485-486.

Tags: 1920, Blake, GlenMullin, Review, TwentyDrawings

In Digital Archive

Keith David Watenpaugh, Modern humanitarianism and the Year of the Locust: US relief in Palestine and Lebanon 1914–18, "Histories of humanitarian action in the Middle East and North Africa", Edited by Eleanor Davey and Eva Svoboda, HPG Working Paper, London: Humanitarian Policy Group, Overseas Development Institute, September 2014 

Tags: 2014

In Digital Archive

Carolyn A. Wallace, "Archivists and the New Copyright Law" [Mary K. Gibran et al, v. Annie Salem Otto], Georgia Archive 6 no. 2 (1978), pp. 1-17.
 
Mary K. Gibran et al, v. Annie Salem Otto, United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division, Civil Action No. 72-H-123. The original complaint was filed on January 28, 1972, and the case was closed on July 10, 1974.
Tags: 1972, 1974, 1978, AnnieSalemOtto, ChapelHill, Copyright, Law, MayKGibran

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Orrick Johns, October 15, 1915
 
Letter to poet Orrick Glenday Johns (June 2, 1887 – July 8, 1946), in part: "How more than gracious of you to send me this remarkable sonnet. It delights me exceedingly, and though it reveals a world beyond my reach I cannot but be moved by it. And what is this in life that sustains us, we poor children of hunger and thirst, but that which intensifies our thirst and deepens our hunger? Is it not the unattainable that loves and comforts us?-and how well you have expressed the unattainable in your sonnet. And may I not know more of you and your work? Indeed it would give me a real pleasure to read your poetry. And if some happy chance should find you again in this city, I would be very glad to see you and talk with you…many thanks for that wonderful sonnet." 
The recipient of this letter, poet Orrick Johns, was part of a literary group that included luminaries T. S. Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. In 1912, Johns rose to literary prominence after winning a poetry contest for his piece 'Second Avenue,' ousting Edna St. Vincent Millay's famed 'Renascence.' His next collection, 'Asphalt and Other Poems' was published in 1917; the warm approval Gibran lavished on him here may have been regarding a sonnet destined for that book.
Tags: 1915, Letters, OrrickJohns

In Digital Archive

Syrian-Lebanese League of Liberation Papers, November 12, 1919 (excerpts)

Tags: 1919, newspaper, Papers, Syrian

In Digital Archive

To Aid Starving Armenians Today, "Arizona Republic" (Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona, United States of America), 21 Oct 1916, p. 12. 

Tags: 1916, ArizonaRepublic, Armenians

In Digital Archive

Kahlil Gibran, Painter, Dies, "St. Louis Post-Dispatch" (St. Louis, Missouri), Sat, Apr 11, 1931, p. 1.

Tags: 1931, death, newspaper

In Digital Archive

Modern American Writers [Gibran's Portrait of Howard W. Cook, 1918], "The Sun", Sunday, December 22, 1918, p. 5.

Tags: 1918, HowardACook, newspaper, portrait

In Digital Archive

The Person of the Living Leader [Talk by Kahlil Gibran with Baha'is], The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York), Sat, Mar 26, 1921, p. 7.

Tags: 1921, newspaper, Talk, TheBrocklynDailyEagle

In Digital Archive

Johan Bojer, Realist [Gibran's Portrait of Joan Bojer], "The New York Times" (New York, New York), Sun, Jan 9, 1921, p. 70.

Tags: 1921, JohanBojer, newspaper, portrait, TheNewYorkTimes

In Digital Archive

[Gibran's] Letter of appreciation to Paris People, "The Paris Morning News" (Paris, Texas), Sat, Nov 18, 1916, p. 7.

______________
LETTER OF APPRECIATION TO PARIS PEOPLE
Recently The News printed an appeal for funds for the stricken Syrians in the Mount Lebanon country working in connection with David Coury, the local merchant. Our appeal and his sollecitation brought forth the generous sum of $430 which was sent to the committee.
We are now in receipt of the following letter to the mayor and citizens of Paris, expressing appreciation for our generous gift:
New York, Nov. 13, 1916.

I wish to thank you in behalf at our committee and in the name of our stricken nation for the help that you have extended to our countrymen in Paris, Texas. The generosity of Americans which knows no racial nor religious bounds is the one beautiful flower today in the desolate garden of humanity. And away out in those ancient hills is the shadows of the sacred cedar, every life redetermed is a new living expression of thanks to America.
Very truly yours
Gibran K. Gibran, Secretary

 

Tags: 1916, aid, appeal, letter, newspaper, Paris, texas, TheParisMorningNews

In Digital Archive

Miss Barbara Young Will Talk on Gibran, "Democrat and Chronicle" (Rochester, New York), 02 Nov 1933, Thu, p. 8.

Tags: 1933, article, BarbaraYoung, news, newspaper, NewYork

In Digital Archive

Letter of Barbara Young to Mr. Isham (and a sketch by Gibran), New York City, 26th April 1931.
 
Young states 'You have been many times in my thoughts since the hour you spent with the great pictures in the Studio' and continues 'All that is now over. We are sailing May 4th for England, then the continent and eventually Syria. The pictures will go almost intact to Beshari', adding that some will remain in the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Young further adds 'I am sending you a sketch which Gibran once sent me in a letter - and was therefore by his own hand. This is my recognition of your beautiful understanding of his work.' 
Tags: 1931, BarbaraYoung, Isham, NewYork, Sketch

In Digital Archive

Barbara Young presents the Works of Kahlil Gibran [Scrapbook], New York 1933 [excerpts].
 
A photo album kept by Barbara Young and used as a scrapbook to house photographs from an exhibit she curated in 1933 at the Sherman Square Hotel in New York City of the works of Kahlil Gibran. This Album is now part of the private collection of Glen Kalem. 
Tags: 1933, BarbaraYoung, Exhibiton, GlenKalem, NewYork, photograpghs, scrapbook

In Digital Archive

Rose Cecil O'Neill, Portrait of Kahlil Gibran, 1914.

Pencil and watercolor wash on paper mounted on paperboard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Smithsonian Women's Committee in memory of Adelyn Dohme Breeskin, 1987.11.

Tags: 1914, Drawing, Pencil, portrait, RoseCecilONeil, Smithsonian, WaterColour

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to James Oppenheim (circa 1916)
 
Letter to James Oppenheim (1882–1932), author and editor of the short-lived Seven Arts magazine. In full: “This war poem came to the Seven Arts through me. It might interest you to read it. I have been wrestling with an angel and a devil during the past two months. And it is indeed terrible to be between two powers so different. In a week or so I shall leave town for a much needed rest in the country. May I not see you before I go?” 
The Seven Arts was founded with the idealistic goal of transforming American life through the arts, featuring contributors such as Dreiser, Frost, Mencken, and Dos Passos, but folded in 1917 after just one year. In 1916, Gibran was preoccupied with the war in his native Syria, actively soliciting funds and suffering emotional distress at any war news; although he diverted his energy toward writing, the predominant theme from this period was death. In September he left New York to visit his sister on Cape Cod hoping to relieve this building stress, but suffered a nervous breakdown. A remarkable letter from a tumultuous period of Gibran’s life that influenced his writing for years to come.
Tags: 1916, JamesOppenheim, Letters, magazine, SevenArts

In Digital Archive

Callum E. Cooper, The psychic life of Dr Alex Tanous, "Paranormal Review", 78 (2016), pp. 8-11. 
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Alex Tanous (Alexander Scandah Tanous, 1926-1990) was a noted American psychic and parapsychologist. He was born to Lebanese parents Ann Alice Shalala and Thomas Tanous (Kettaneh), the eldest of eight brothers. His father was a friend of the Lebanese writer Kahlil Gibran, who once predicted: ‘You will have a son, a man of exceptional gifts, of great abilities – but also a man of great sorrows.’
Tags: 2016, alextanous, Review

In Digital Archive

Letter of Kahlil Gibran to Marie Azeez El-Khoury (Boston, undated)
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O Beloved Marie, 
Beginning Sunday and up till this hour, I have been among friends and acquaintances, like a boat in the middle of the sea rolled by the waves and buffeted by winds, I became tired of being honored and flattered and invited, however, I am yearning for the golden corner that is filled with quiet and silence - and now, I stole an hour from my friends and came to a room to be alone and talk to you to revive my spirit with ideas and dreams that swim around my head when I sit alone and think of you. You, Marie, are like the pure morning breeze carrying the fragrance of flowers and breaths of bouquets. So, when I think of you I feel an internal ease as though my spirits have been bathed by waves of this perfumed breeze. 
Christmas has passed but it did not leave in my heart except regret, longing, and sad memories. However, I put on the appearance of happiness and joy before those whom I like and who like me. And I hate putting on appearances, even the kind that makes other people happy. Holidays, Marie, are seasons of happiness for some people but seasons of sadness for many. 
I will return to New York by the end of the week, and were it not for some work I would return tomorrow, but it is life that steers us sometimes through valleys and other times to the top of the mountains. And even though I consider myself to be free, I still am obliged to pay attention to my work and the relationships my work has created with others. 
I long for you, O Marie, with all the yearning of fire. I long for the playing, laughter, and smiles, and for the touch of your hands and your shoulders. And I long for your teasing me!! 
Think about me a little if you are able, and allow me to place a small kiss—a very small kiss—on your tender palm. 
May the heavens keep you 
Gibran 
27 Tyler St. (Boston)
 
Tags: letter, MarieAzeezEl-Khoury, undated

In Digital Archive

Naseeb Arida (?), Synopsis of al-Funoon, Vol. 1, No 1, April 1913 (typescript)

Tags: 1913, al-funoon, al-funun, NaseebArida, thepenbond, thepenleague

In Digital Archive

Siegfried Sassoon on Kahlil Gibran, Journal, 10 Feb. 1920 (manuscript)
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Siegfried Loraine Sassoon (1886-1967), well known as a highly decorated English soldier and writer, was one of the leading poets of the First World War. His verse, that described the horrors of the trenches and satirized the patriotic spirit, greatly influenced Wilfred Owen )1893-1918(, who was the most famous poet- soldier of English literature and to whom Sassoon was mentor. 
On 28 January 1920, Sassoon arrived in New York for a lecture tour and Gibran, eager to draw him for his ”Temple of Art,“ got an appointment with him on 10 February. On that cold and snowy Tuesday, the two lunched together and Sassoon accepted to sit for a portrait. After coming back to the Seville Hotel, at 88 Madison Avenue, Sassoon wrote down in his notebook: 
”Tues. 10th - Dreary morning of thawing snow. Lunched with Kahlil Gibran, a little Syrian artist & poet; he did a drawing of me. He has done Masefield & Yeats with success, & showed me Rodin & Debussy, which looked all right. He seems a very nice creature. Nothing commercial about his point of view. (Tuesday, 10 Feb. 1920)“ 
Thanks to this unique document it is now possible to attribute an identity to a portrait hitherto left unnamed amongst others kept safe by the Gibran National Committee, Beirut, Lebanon. 
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- Physical Location: Cambridge University Library, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives 
- Classmark: MS Add.9852/1/14 
- Title: Journal, 21 Jan. 1920-22 Apr. 1920, p. 18

 

Tags: 1920, journal, manuscript, SiefriedSassoon

In Digital Archive

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Pity The Nation (After K. Gibran), with an original painting by Soheyl Dahi, San Francisco [CA]: Sore Dove Press, 2007.
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Printed letterpress and bound into card covers; limited to an edition of 100 signed and numbered copies.

Tags: 2007, LawrenceFerlinghetti, PityTheNation

In Digital Archive

Victor Hakim, La littérature syro-libanaise de langue arabe, "Les Nouvelles littéraires, artistiques et scientifiques", 12-1-1935, p. 6.

Tags: 1935, article, french, syro-libanaise, VictorHakim

In Digital Archive

Ligue pour la liberation de la Syrie et du Liban (Chronique Syrienne), "Correspondance d'Orient", 11-10-1917, pp. 283-284. 

Tags: 1917, french

In Digital Archive

Wrapping the Grapeleaves: A Sheaf of Contemporary Arab-American Poets, Edited by Gregory Orfalea (inscribed by the Editor), Washington, D.C.: American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, 1982.

Tags: 1982, ArabAmerica, Review

In Digital Archive

Rodney P. Carlisle, Multicultural America: Volume II: The Arab Americans, New York, NY: Infobase Publishing, 2011.

Tags: 2011, ArabAmerica, book, Review

In Digital Archive

Ameen Albert Rihani, The Book of Khalid and The Prophet. Similar Universal Concerns with Different Perspectives: A Comparative Study, PALMA, Volume 7, Issue no. 1, 2001, pp. 31-41. 
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Presented at "The Gibran International Conference", University of Maryland, College Park, December 9-12, 1999, Maryland USA.
Tags: 1999, conference, Rihani, study, thebookofkhalid, TheProphet

In Digital Archive

Rashad Rida, From Cultural Authenticity to Social Relevance: The Plays of Amin al-Rihani, Kahlil Gibran, and Karim Alrawi, in Colors of Enchantment: Theater, Dance, Music, and the Visual Arts of the Middle East, Edited by Sherifa Zuhur, Cairo-New York: The American University in Cairo Press, 2001, pp. 151-174.

Tags: 2001, plays, study

In Digital Archive

Christopher Buck, “Kahlil Gibran”, in American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, Supplement XX, Edited by Jay Parini, Farmington Hills, MI: Scribner’s Reference/The Gale Group, 2010, pp. 113–129.

Tags: 2010, biographies, study

In Digital Archive

George H.W. Bush, Remarks at the Dedication Ceremony for the Khalil Gibran Memorial Garden, Washington, D.C., May 24, 1991, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: George H.W. Bush (1991, Book I), pp. 556 - 557. 
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The President spoke at 8:59 a.m. in the Khalil Gibran Memorial Garden (Washington, D.C.). In his opening remarks, he referred to William J. Baroody, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and president of the Khalil Gibran Centennial Foundation; Sheryl Ameen, member of the board of directors of the foundation; Peter S. Tannous and Adelaine Abercia, chairman and vice-chairman of the dedication committee; Ambassador Nassib S. Lahoud of Lebanon; Representative Mary Rose Oakar; and entertainers Flip Wilson and Jamie Farr. Following his remarks, the President traveled to Boston, MA.
Tags: 1991, dedication, memorial, Presidents, PublicPapers, Remarks

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, "Figli dei cedri in America. Il carteggio tra Ğubrān Ḫalīl Ğubrān e Amīn Fāris al-Rīḥānī", La rivista di Arablit, I, 1, June 2011, pp. 83–112.

Tags: 2011, FrancescoMedici, study

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Il dramma di Lazzaro. Kahlil Gibran e Luigi Pirandello, «Asprenas», 49, 2002, pp. 33–56.

Tags: drama, FrancescoMedici, italian, lazarus, play

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Speak to us of Beauty. On "Twenty Drawings" by Kahlil Gibran, «FMR», 26 (July-August), 2008, pp. 101–115.

Tags: 2008, FrancescoMedici, study, TwentyDrawings

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Un abito arabo per "Il Profeta". Lettere inedite di Kahlil Gibran a Antony Bashir, «Kervan», 7-11, gennaio 2010, pp. 37–57.

Tags: 2010, AntonyBashir, FrancescoMedici, italian, Letters

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, "Il Profeta" di Gibran diventa un cartone, «Paneacqua», May 2012, XVII, 197, 51-53. 

Tags: 2012, FrancescoMedici, italian, study

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Kahlil Gibran e l’Italia, «incroci», no. 35, Jan-Jun 2017, pp. 61-76.

Tags: 2017, FrancescoMedici, italian, study

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Leggere Gibran in un’era di globalizzazione e conflitti, «Asprenas», 59, 1-4, 2012, pp. 207–212.

Tags: 2012, FrancescoMedici, italian, study

In Digital Archive

Maya El Hajj, Aporias in Literary Translation: A Case Study of "The Prophet" and Its Translations, "Theory and Practice in Language Studies", Vol. 9, No. 4, April 2019, pp. 396-404.

Tags: 2019, FrancescoMedici, GlenKalem, study, TheProphet, Translations

In Digital Archive

Maria Amalia De Luca, Le lettere di Gibràn a Mayy Ziyàdah, "Oriente Moderno", LX, 1980, pp. 123–131.

Tags: 1980, Letters, MariaAmaliaDeLuca, MayyZiyadah

In Digital Archive

Lettere a Mayy di Gibràn Khalìl Gibràn, versione dall'arabo di Maria Amalia De Luca, prefazione di Andrea Borruso, "Quaderni del Mediterraneo", 2, 1981, pp. 29–127.

Tags: 1981, italian, Letters, MariaAmaliaDeLuca, MayyZiyadah

In Digital Archive

Las Virgenes de las Praderas, Traducción de Haikal Obaid Raide, Santiago (Chile): Dunia, 1961.
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A translation from the original Arabic into Spanish of Ara'is al-Muruj (Nymphs of the Valley)
Tags: 1961, chile, nymphsofthevalley, translation

In Digital Archive

Art World Calm During Holidays, ”The Philadelphia Inquirer”, 13 Dec. 1914.

Tags: 1914, article, MontrossGallaries, newspaper

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Parlaci della bellezza. Su "Venti disegni" di Kahlil Gibran, «FMR», 26 (luglio-agosto), 2008, pp. 101–115.

Tags: 2008, FrancescoMedici, italian, TwentyDrawings

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Parlez-nous de la beauté. Sur "Twenty Drawings" de Kahlil Gibran, Traduction de l’italien par Geneviève Lambert, «FMR», 26 (Juillet-Août), 2008, pp. 101–115.

Tags: 2008, critic, Drawings, FrancescoMedici, french, translation, TwentyDrawings

In Digital Archive

Francesco Medici, Háblanos de la belleza. "Twenty Drawings" de Kahlil Gibran, Traducido del italiano por Antonio Abellán, «FMR», 26 (Julio-Agosto), 2008, pp. 101–115.

Tags: 2008, critic, FrancescoMedici, spanish, translation, TwentyDrawings

In Digital Archive

K. Gibran, Le prophète, Traduit de l'anglais et présenté par Anne Wade Minkowski, Préface d'Adonis, Paris: Gallimard, 1992.

Tags: 1992, french, Paris, TheProphet, translation