The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Latest

19 Feb 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran’s Matchmaker Friend, Salim Sarkis

Salim Sarkis: Gibran’s Matchmaker Friend by Bob Goodhouse © all rights reserved 2020    Salim S. Sarkis (1867-1926), born in Beirut, lived at 76 Broad St in the Syrian New York Colony from 1899-1904, and published the Al Musheer (“The Counselor”) weekly newspaper at 38 Broad St. Like many Syrian-Lebanese of the time, he left Beirut for Egypt, and ultimately the United States. Unlike many of his compatriots, he decided to return to Egypt after a few years in America.Al Musheer had been a popular Egyptian weekly in Cairo from 1894-1899, famous for being one of the first journals to use political cartoons to editorialize what Sar...

16 Feb 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran on Philology: A New Unpublished Letter Found

By Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem-Habib  © all rights reserved 2020 The Kahlil Gibran Collective has revealed the discovery of an unpublished letter of Kahlil Gibran to an unknown recipient, talking about his newfound appreciation for Philology.   Though I am not a linguist, philology has been, and is now, one of the most interesting subjects to me.  Medici and Kalem-Habib's research was unable to place a date to the letter,  nor who its recipient was. Looking at content and subject matter, the researchers estimate it was written in-between 1925-1930. Gibran, "a man of (many) letters"  took so much pride and care in writing them and this letter reveals much of that pride and care when he says;   ...

9 Nov 2019     Glen Kalem
“And you, vast sea,...” How one small word change changed quite a lot

by Philippe Maryssael, retired translator and terminologist. Arlon, Belgium, 2 November 2019. Abstract “And you, vast sea, sleeping mother”: a short, six-word sentence at the top of page 10 of the first edition of Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet, published in 1923, was later changed to “And you, vast sea, sleepless mother.” The aim of this paper is to try and provide answers to the following questions: when did the change occur?, why did Kahlil Gibran ask his publisher, Alfred Knopf, to change his text?, and who could have influenced Gibran to change it? Also considered in this paper is the question of the versions of the text that were used by the men and w...

20 Jan 2020     Glen Kalem
Translations for The Prophet now stands at 112

By The Kahlil Gibran Collective, all rights reserved © The Kahlil Gibran Collective 2020 In April 2017, during the third international conference on Kahlil Gibran held at the Lebanese American University in Beirut, Kahlil Gibran scholars Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem-Habib shared their findings on the official number of first edition language translations of The Prophet. The number they registered in the year-long study was 104 titles. This study has been an ongoing one, and sure enough just over a year later they further announced another

12 Oct 2019     Glen Kalem
The Spread and Influence of Gibran in China

Research on the Spread and Influence of Gibran in China The Contrast between Translation and Research and its Reflection By Lijuan Gan, Professor, Tianjin Normal University Xuehua Miao, Associate Professor, Harbin Normal University Wei Liang, Instructor, Hunan-First Normal University Edited by Glen Kalem-Habib In November 2013, I had the pleasure of being invited to attend a three-day Middle Eastern literature conference at Peking...

19 Feb 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran’s Matchmaker Friend, Salim Sarkis

Salim Sarkis: Gibran’s Matchmaker Friend by Bob Goodhouse © all rights reserved 2020    Salim S. Sarkis (1867-1926), born in Beirut, lived at 76 Broad St in the Syrian New York Colony from 1899-1904, and published the Al Musheer (“The Counselor”) weekly newspaper at 38 Broad St. Like many Syrian-Lebanese of the time, he left Beirut for Egypt, and ultimately the United States. Unlike many of his compatriots, he decided to return to Egypt after a few years in America.Al Musheer had been a popular Egyptian weekly in Cairo from 1894-1899, famous for being one of the first journals to use political cartoons to editorialize what Sar...