The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Latest

11 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
‘The Way Seemed Long and Rough’ An Unpublished Prose Poem for Josephine Peabody

edited by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem Kahlil Gibran tried out his early poetry on Josephine Peabody (1874-1922), a fine American poet and dramatist, and instructor in English at Wellesley College from 1901 to 1903. He attempted to explain what he was up to in his Arabic poems to his friend, and took with her his first tottering steps in English composition. One of those immature prose poems remains, dating probably from 1904, among Josephine’s papers in Harvard University Library:

5 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
Gibran in the First Issue of Al-Funoon

by Francesco Medici © Copyright Francesco Medici All Rights Reserved 2019 The Arab-American literary monthly review Al-Funoon (“The Arts”) began publication in April 1913 in New York City by editor and publisher Nasib Aridah,[1] already founder there in 1912 of the “Al-Atlantic Publishing Co.” After 29 issues it ceased publication in August 1918 due to several factors, such as paper supply, lack of subscription payment, manpower availability and World War I.[2]

13 Jun 2019     Glen Kalem
“Generations will not exhaust it”: A Prophecy about "The Prophet"

by Tania June Sammons © Copyright Tania June Sammons All Rights Reserved 2019 In October 1923, educator, philanthropist, and traveler Mary Haskell prophesized the success of The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran after receiving a copy of the book she helped bring to fruition. This book will be held as one of the treasures of English literature. And in our darkness we will open it to find ourselves again and the heaven and earth within ourselves. Generations will not exhaust it, but instead, generation after generation will find in the book what they would fain be—and it will be better loved as we grow riper and riper. Nearly one hundred years later The Prophet has sold millions of copies worldwide, never gone ...

23 Jun 2019     Glen Kalem
An Arabic Garment for The Prophet

Gibran’s Letters to Antony Bashir by Francesco Medici © Copyright Francesco Medici All Rights Reserved 2019 As a young clergyman, the Lebanese-born Antony (Antonious) Bashir (1898-1966), future Orthodox Archbishop of New York and Metropolitan of All North American archdiocese of the Church of Antioch from 1936 to 1966, was adept at translating from English into Arabic. It was Gibran who chose to entrust Bashir with the Arabic translation of all his English works published by Knopf in New York: The Madman (1918), The Forerunner (1920), The Prophet (1923), Sand and Foam (1926), Jesus, the Son of Man (1928), The Earth Gods (1931). ...

23 May 2019     Glen Kalem
Gibran at the Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind

by Joseph Nahas edited by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem One day, instead of eating our lunch at the restaurant, Gibran and I prepared our own sandwiches and walked over to Battery Park. There we saw a blind man sitting on a bench, running his fingers over a white page covered with dots protruding through embossing. The man’s lips moved as if he were whispering to himself, as his fingers moved over the white sheet. As we passed by the blind man, Gibran remarked, “Let’s sit on the adjoining bench, eat our sandwiches quietly while watching this man with ‘seeing fingers.’” We sat down eating, while our eyes were fixed on the blind man, watching the expressions on his face, smiling now, frowning then, as his fingers deftly moved over one line after another, page after page. ...

11 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
‘The Way Seemed Long and Rough’ An Unpublished Prose Poem for Josephine Peabody

edited by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem Kahlil Gibran tried out his early poetry on Josephine Peabody (1874-1922), a fine American poet and dramatist, and instructor in English at Wellesley College from 1901 to 1903. He attempted to explain what he was up to in his Arabic poems to his friend, and took with her his first tottering steps in English composition. One of those immature prose poems remains, dating probably from 1904, among Josephine’s papers in Harvard University Library: