The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Latest

6 Oct 2019     Glen Kalem
Kahlil Gibran’s Community in New York: A Special Photograph Analyzed by Robert Goodhouse

By Todd Fine  Originally Published on HuffPost 06/15/2017 The field of Arab American studies is being revolutionized by a movement of independent scholars that is leveraging the new accessibility of genealogical information and newspapers in digital databases. Important topics like the history of the “Syrian quarter” in Lower Manhattan and the biographies of key Arab American political and literary figures are being finally written by scholars like Linda Jacobs, Jean Gibran, Charles Malouf Samaha, Francesco Medici, Mary Ann DiNapoli, Gregory J. Shibley, and Robert Goodhouse.

21 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
'The Voice of Silence' Gibran As Told and Recorded by Mercedes de Acosta

Mercedes de Acosta: “Gibran Was a Great Spiritual Teacher” edited by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem-Habib Mercedes de Acosta (1892-1968) was an American poet, playwright, and novelist. She was professionally unsuccessful but is known for her many lesbian relationships with famous Broadway and Hollywood personalities and numerous friendships with prominent artists of the period.

5 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
Gibran in the First Issue of Al-Funoon

by Francesco Medici © Copyright Francesco Medici All Rights Reserved 2019 The Arab-American literary monthly review Al-Funoon (“The Arts”) began publication in April 1913 in New York City by editor and publisher Nasib Aridah,[1] already founder there in 1912 of the “Al-Atlantic Publishing Co.” After 29 issues it ceased publication in August 1918 due to several factors, such as paper supply, lack of subscription payment, manpower availability and World War I.[2]

11 Jul 2019     Glen Kalem
‘The Way Seemed Long and Rough’ An Unpublished Prose Poem for Josephine Peabody

edited by Francesco Medici and Glen Kalem Kahlil Gibran tried out his early poetry on Josephine Peabody (1874-1922), a fine American poet and dramatist, and instructor in English at Wellesley College from 1901 to 1903. He attempted to explain what he was up to in his Arabic poems to his friend, and took with her his first tottering steps in English composition. One of those immature prose poems remains, dating probably from 1904, among Josephine’s papers in Harvard University Library:

23 Jun 2019     Glen Kalem
An Arabic Garment for The Prophet

Gibran’s Letters to Antony Bashir by Francesco Medici © Copyright Francesco Medici All Rights Reserved 2019 As a young clergyman, the Lebanese-born Antony (Antonious) Bashir (1898-1966), future Orthodox Archbishop of New York and Metropolitan of All North American archdiocese of the Church of Antioch from 1936 to 1966, was adept at translating from English into Arabic. It was Gibran who chose to entrust Bashir with the Arabic translation of all his English works published by Knopf in New York: The Madman (1918), The Forerunner (1920), The Prophet (1923), Sand and Foam (1926), Jesus, the Son of Man (1928), The Earth Gods (1931). ...

6 Oct 2019     Glen Kalem
Kahlil Gibran’s Community in New York: A Special Photograph Analyzed by Robert Goodhouse

By Todd Fine  Originally Published on HuffPost 06/15/2017 The field of Arab American studies is being revolutionized by a movement of independent scholars that is leveraging the new accessibility of genealogical information and newspapers in digital databases. Important topics like the history of the “Syrian quarter” in Lower Manhattan and the biographies of key Arab American political and literary figures are being finally written by scholars like Linda Jacobs, Jean Gibran, Charles Malouf Samaha, Francesco Medici, Mary Ann DiNapoli, Gregory J. Shibley, and Robert Goodhouse.