The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Kahlil Gibran Digital Archive

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In Digital Archive

A Man from Lebanon Nineteen Centuries Afterward, The Syrian World, 3, 5, November 1928, 21–26 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: aManfromLebanon, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgiban, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Defeat [poem], The Syrian World, 3, 7, January 1929, p. 23 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1929, Defeat, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgiban, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Fame, translated by Andrew Ghareeb, The Syrian World, 3, 10, April 1929, p. 28 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1929, Fame, Ghareeb, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Freedom and Slavery [poem], The Syrian World, 6, 6, February 1932, p. 43 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1932, FreedomandSlavery, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

John G. Moses, Annotated Index to The Syrian World, 1926-1932, with the assistance of Eugene Paul Nassar, edited by Judith Rosenblatt, Saint Paul, Minnesota: University of Minnesota - Immigration History Research Center, 1994.

Tags: 1926, 1932, annotatedindex, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

Khairallah Tannous Khairallah, La Syrie, Paris: Ernest Leroux, 1912.

Tags: 1912, JubranKhalilJubran, kahlilgiban, KhairallahTannousKhairallah, LaSyrie

In Digital Archive

al-Nabī [The Prophet], Translated into Arabic by Antūniyūs Bashīr, al-Qāirah: al-Maṭbaʻah al-Raḥmānīyah bi-Miṣr, 1926.

Tags: 1926, al-nabi, arabic, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgiran, TheProphet

In Digital Archive

Kalimat Jubran, edited by Antonius Bashir, Beirut: al-Maktabat al-Thaqafia, n.d. [1st edition: al-Qahirah: Yusuf Bustani, 1927].

Tags: 1927, AntoniusBashir, Bustani, JubranKhalilJubran, kahilgibran, KalimatJubran

In Digital Archive

Gibran’s Message to Young Americans of Syrian Origin (reprinted from the first issue of Syrian World), The Syrian World, 5, 8, April 1931, pp. 44–45 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

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The issue is especially long as it was published the same month famed poet and contributor to the Syrian World, Kahlil Gibran, passed away. There are only just a few inclusions in the article that are not related to Gibran's passing. The first is an article discussing the concept of chivalry in Arabia and Islam. This article primarily deals with the origin of chivalry, which seems to point to the crusades in which Moslem and Christian knights met in combat. Salloum Mokarzel in addition to his tribute work to Gibran is featured for the continuation of his travels through Jebel-Druze. There is then the usual installment of Ali Zaibaq, now a regular series of The Syrian World, and finally there is the inclusion of what usually closes the issues out, the political developments in Syria and excerpts from the Arab press. However intermingled within the regular stories, are works dedicated to Gibran. First there is a discussion of his last days, followed by a description of his Boston funeral. The remainder of the pieces are works by other authors normally featured in the Syrian World, and while the rest pay tribute to one of the most important Lebanese literary figures of all time.

Tags: 1931, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, MessagetoYoungAmercicans, SyrainWorld, Syrian

In Digital Archive

On Giving and Taking, The Syrian World, 4, 7, March 1930, p. 32 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1930, GibrankhalilGibran, GivingandTaking, kahilgibran, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

On Giving and Taking, The Syrian World, 5, 2, October 1930, p. 38 [digitized by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA].

Tags: 1930, GibrankhalilGibran, GivingandTaking, kahlilgibran, TheSyrianWorld

In Digital Archive

The Syrian American Directory Almanac 1930, New York: Arida & Andria, 1929, pp. 17, 43.

Tags: 1930, almanac, directory, GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgiban, Syrian

In Digital Archive

The Art of Kahlil Gibran [Exhibition Guide], Boston Public Library, January 6-29, 1983.

Tags: 1983, Boston, Exhibiton, kahlilgeorgegibran, theartofkahlilgibran

In Digital Archive

Twelve books in one omnibus edition: The Prophet, The Wanderer, Sand and Foam, The Madman, The Forerunner, The Earth Gods, Nymphs of the Valley, Tears and Laughter, Between Night and Morn, Secrets of the Heart, Spirits Rebellious, The Broken Wings.

Tags: betweennightandmorn, Forerunner, Madman, nymphsofthevalley, Prophet, sandandfoam, SecretsofTheHeart, SpiritsRebellious, tearsandlaughter, thebrokenwings, theearthgods, Wanderer

In Digital Archive

‎al-Rābiṭah al-Qalamiyyah (The Pen League), also known as Arrabitah, was the first Arab-American literary society, formed initially by Nasib Arida and Abdul Massih Haddad in 1915-1916, and subsequently re-formed in 1920 by a group of Arab writers in New York led by Kahlil Gibran, from a group of writers who has been working closely since 1911. The league dissolved following Gibran's death in 1931 and Mikhail Naimy's return to Lebanon in 1932. The primary goals of The Pen League were, in Naimy's words as Secretary, "to lift Arabic literature from the quagmire of stagnation and imitation, and to infuse a new life into its veins so as to make of it an active force in the building up of the Arab nations", and to promote a new generation of Arab writers. As Naimy expressed in the by-laws he drew up for the group: "The tendency to keep our language and literature within the narrow bounds of aping the ancients in form and substance is a most pernicious tendency; if left unopposed, it will soon lead to decay and disintegration... To imitate them is a deadly shame... We must be true to ourselves if we would be true to our ancestors."

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In Digital Archive

Ameen Rihani [Amīn Fāris al-Rīḥānī], Ilà Jubrān [To Gibran], Hutāf al-awdiyah: shiʻr manthūr [Hymn of the Valleys: Prose Poems], Bayrūt: Dār al-Rīḥānī lil-Ṭibāʻah wa-al-Nashr, 1955, pp. 123-136.

Tags: 1955, AmeenRihani, GibrankhalilGibran, HymnOfTheValley

In Digital Archive

Elia Abu Madi [Īlīyā Abū Māḍī], Diwān Īlīyā Abū Māḍī, Muqaddimah Jubrān Khalīl Jubrān [Introduction by Kahlil Gibran], New York: Matba'at Mir'at al-Gharb, 1919, pp. 3-5.

Tags: 1919, diwanlliyaabumadi, eliaabumadi, introduction, Mira'atal-gharb, NewYork

In Digital Archive

ʻAbd al-Masīḥ Ḥaddād, Inṭibāʻāt mughtarib fī Sūrīyah, Dimashq: Wizārat al-Thaqāfah wa-al-Irshād al-Qawmī, Mudīrīyat al-Taʼlīf wa-al-Tarjamah, 1962

Tags: abd-al-Masih, al-Rabitahal-Qalamiyah, JubranKhalilJubran, thepenbond, thepenleague

In Digital Archive

A collection of four stories. The title character of “Warda al-Hani” is a young woman in an arranged marriage with a kindly older man whom she does not love. She leaves him for a younger lover, disgraced in the eyes of the world but honest in love. In “Surakk al-qubur” (The Cry of the Graves) the emir sentences three criminals to death: a young man who murdered an official, a woman caught by her husband in adultery, and an old man who stole precious ornaments from a church. The narrator approves of the emir’s stern justice, but the day after the executions he learns the truth: the young man was defending a girl the official wanted to rape; the woman loved a young man but had been married against her will; and the old man rented land from the monastery, but the monks left him with so little that his family was starving. In “Madja’ al-’arus” (The Bridal Bed), which Gibran claims is a true story, a girl is tricked into marrying a man she does not love; she kills her true love and herself on her wedding day. In “Khalil al-kafir” (Khalil the Heretic), the most ambitious story in the collection, the young monk Khalil denounces other monks for violating the teachings of Christ. He is beaten and brought to trial, where his eloquence wins over the villagers. They demand that he be made headman, but Khalil knows that power corrupts. He refuses the position and lives quietly with his lover.

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In Digital Archive

Al-Ajnihah al-Mutakassirah [Broken Wings], New York: Mir'at al-Gharb, 1912 [owned by Mary Elizabeth Haskell; inscribed by the Author]. In 1912 Gibran published al-Ajniha al-mutakassira, which he seems to have written several years earlier. The novella is his only attempt at a sustained narrative. When he was eighteen, the narrator fell in love in Beirut with Salma Karama. Forced by her father to marry an archbishop’s nephew, Salma was able to meet her lover occasionally until they were discovered together. Salma was then confined to her home and eventually died in childbirth. Reviews in the Arabic press were strongly positive, though there were some reservations about the character of Salma and Gibran’s views on the position of Arab women. The book led to a correspondence with the Syrian writer May Ziyada that evolved into an epistolary love affair.

Tags: GibrankhalilGibran, kahlilgibran, maryhaskellminis, thebrokenwings