The Kahlil Gibran Collective

The Artist The Poet The Man

The Latest

4 Jun 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran, Lebanese or Italian?

 ‘What have you to do with me? I am an Italian!’ by Francesco Medici © Francesco Medici - all rights reserved 2020  “Forgive me my curiosity – what country do you hail from?  You look to me like a Frenchman or an Italian.”[1]

24 May 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran Answers the “Proust Questionnaire”

by Francesco Medici - Translated into English by Nadine Najem© Francesco Medici & Nadine Najem - all rights reserved 2020 One day, during his youth, the future great French writer Marcel Proust (1871-1922) was asked by his friend Antoinette Faure a series of questions in English language – in fact they were in vogue among the British Victorian families, as a form of parlor games, some questionnaires designed to discover the personal tastes and aspirations of those who answered them. Proust’s answers were published only in 1924, two years after his death. This was the origin of the famous “Proust Questionnaire”, whose success has come down to the present day.

4 May 2020     Glen Kalem
Xianzhi: Gibran’s The Prophet in Chinese (1931)

Xianzhi: Gibran’s The Prophet in Chinese (1931) by Francesco Medici© Copyright Francesco Medici All Rights Reserved 2020 The first to translate a selection of Gibran’s works into Chinese was Mao Dun (Máo Dùn, 1896-1981), known by the pen name of Shen Dehong

15 May 2020     Glen Kalem
Kahlil Gibran and Faris Malouf: The Story of an Unsuccessful Venture (1924-25)

by Charles Malouf Samaha Copyright © 2020 by Charles Malouf Samaha. All rights reserved. Faris Saleem Malouf (1892-1958) emigrated from Lebanon to the United States in 1907. Like many Lebanese immigrants, he started peddling, but

24 Apr 2020     Glen Kalem
Kahlil Gibran and the Armenians

Kahlil Gibran and the Armenians by Francesco Medici - Translated into English and Arabic by Nadine Najem.  © Francesco Medici - all rights reserved 2020 Introduction by: Glen Kalem-Habib The 24th of April (today) in 1916 for many Armenians around the world commemorate the tragic events of what is now recognized as the Armenian Genocide (or Holocaust). The atrocities committed by the Turkish-Ottoman forces between 1914 and 1923 are estimated to have killed 1.5 million Armenians, in what is widely accepted as the “first modern day genocide”. Second only to the Holocaust, many studies have been made and continue to be made, about these horror killings which occurred during the WWI period. Around the same time, main...

4 Jun 2020     Glen Kalem
Gibran, Lebanese or Italian?

 ‘What have you to do with me? I am an Italian!’ by Francesco Medici © Francesco Medici - all rights reserved 2020  “Forgive me my curiosity – what country do you hail from?  You look to me like a Frenchman or an Italian.”[1]